Are you experienced?

October 12, 2008

Via Fausta. A video exploring The Prophet Barack’s claim that Sarah Palin isn’t experienced enough by first looking at her resume, then his.

Should have kept your mouth shut, Barack.

 

Ooops. Feeling beat up

 


Don’t be silly

October 12, 2008

There are plenty of good, solid reasons to be vehemently opposed to an Obama presidency. Claiming Obama isn’t a natural-born US citizen isn’t one of them:

 

Before we go any further, look at this post at Screw Loose Change about the main speaker in the film, Philip Berg. The man is a 9-11 Truther who has sued in court to have President Bush and Vice-President Cheney arrested for causing the attacks of September 11th.

This man is a fruitcake with extra nuts. Silly

This conspiracy-mongering is the kind of garbage I’d expect from Kos-Kids (or Andrew Sullivan) who think Sarah Palin’s son Trig is really her grandson. We only hurt our own cause by giving it any credence. If we’re to elect John McCain, we have to convince independent voters that he is far more qualified than Barack Obama and that Obama is dangerously unqualified to be president in a time of war and economic crisis. Sounding like a bunch of tinfoil hat wearers isn’t going to do it.

Let’s stick to the issues, please.

LINKS: Ed at Hot Air provides all the proof one should need that Obama really is a natural-born US citizen. Thanks for the link, Ed!

 


Y’all are ballot cattle!

October 12, 2008

I think McCain should send this guy to the next debate as his stand-in:

 

Not worthy

 

(hat tips: Fausta and Baldilocks)

 


Hope, Change, and a Gazebo – Updated

October 12, 2008

One of the Prophet Barack's arguments for why he should be president is that he's a reformer who has always worked for change. Since his record in Congress is so thin (He started running for president after only two years, after all.), it's natural to look at his record as a "change agent" in Illinois. Trouble is, there's not much there, either: voting "present" 130 times in the Illinois Senate doesn't leave much of a trail, and Obama avoids going into detail in his work at the Chicago Annenberg Challenge, Woods Fund, and Joyce Foundation. (Though follow the links for helpful information Obama would rather not talk about.)

Among the few things we can look at, however, is Obama's involvement in a community redevelopment project to build a botanical garden in a blighted area of Chicago. The verdict: a failure of judgment and no evidence of any real commitment to change

“Judgment to Lead” is supposedly what Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama brings to the table. The claim, as PJM’s Pam Meister described it last month, is that “he may not have the same experience as his opponent, but he has what it takes to make the right call.”

While others search vainly for examples in Obama’s political life supporting that claim, I will describe a situation — what was has come to be known as the “Obamazebo” — where he clearly made the wrong call, demonstrated poor judgment, and utterly failed to lead. Though the amount of money involved is minor, the story is nonetheless revealing, and ultimately provides a window into Obama’s unfitness to be president.

Read the whole thing, but, to summarize:

  • Then-State Senator Obama sought Illinois funds to help build a botanical garden. $100,000 was allocated.
  • Nine years later, no botanical garden has been built, only a rotting gazebo remains, and much of the money seems to have gone to a contractor –an Obama donor– who did little to no work.
  • Obama himself has never followed up on this, nor does he apparently care.

This one incident, while involving relatively small amounts of money, is illustrative of Obama's real record as a reformer. It reveals him for the slick-talking phony he is.

That's change we need? Raised Eyebrow

UPDATE: In an article criticizing McCain's campaign, David Freddoso points out some glaring examples of Obama's true record as a reformer:

As chairman of the Chicago Annenberg Challenge, an educational reform project that Ayers founded, Obama presided over a waste of $160 million in donors' money. The project, under his leadership, failed to improve student achievement in the 210 Chicago schools where it operated, according to the Annenberg Challenge's final report. And to this day, that project is Obama's only significant executive experience.

Obama's legislative leadership was similar, a case study in wasting other people's money. In Springfield, Obama wrote letters from his public position to get Rezko $14 million for his slum-development enterprise. Obama co-sponsored several pieces of housing legislation favorable to Rezko and other slum-developers, giving them hundreds of millions in subsidies and other tax and regulatory advantages. They in turn funneled money to Obama's campaigns and then let their buildings deteriorate, even turning off the heat on their tenants during the winter. By his own account, Obama never bothered to follow up on how the money was spent, but the record shows that he worked in every legislative session to provide more for his developer friends.

McCain's campaign should also pick up on another story that casts doubt upon Obama's leadership and integrity, carried in late April by the Los Angeles Times on how state Senator Obama and his aide, Dan Shomon, helped steer taxpayers' money to one of Obama's private law clients. The client, Robert Blackwell, had just paid Obama $112,000 in his capacity as a private attorney for one of his corporations. State Senator Obama and Shomon then helped Blackwell obtain $320,000 in state tourism grants to hold ping-pong tournaments. As he writes in "The Audacity of Hope," this work came at a time when Obama was short of cash, and the Times reported that work for Obama at the firm had also been thin. In his state Senate financial-disclosure forms, Obama buried this obvious conflict of interest amid a long list of his firm's clients. From simply looking at Obama's disclosures, one could never guess that Blackwell's company had paid him a majority of his income for 2001.

(hat tip: Jennifer Rubin)

Policy and character.