Whiner in Chief

May 26, 2010

Last night, while attending to what’s important, raising money for Barbara Boxer’s reelection (What Gulf Coast oil spill?), President Obama had this to say:

Let’s face it this has been the toughest year and a half since any year and a half since the 1930s.

Daniel Halper is having none of it:

This is the most revealing comment Obama has made publicly in a long while. It shows his self-absorption and utter lack of a sense of history.

Sure, FDR had a tough ‘30s with the economy and all, but by the time the ‘40s hit, it was smooth sailing. (What’s worse: the Nazis and the threat of world-dominating totalitarianism or the obstructionist Republicans?) And President Harry Truman really had an easy time ending World War II, and having to nuke the Japanese. President Dwight Eisenhower only had the Korean War to worry about – and who remembers that, anyway? JFK and LBJ had Vietnam – not to mention the worry that the Russians might nuke America from Cuba, or any other place in the world, etc., etc., etc.

Callow, narcissistic, ignorant of history, thin-skinned, and now a whiner whom a real president would have told to “get out of the kitchen.”

We’ve got a good one here, alright.


I know some people hate polls…

May 26, 2010

But they do make good blog-fodder when time is short. Besides, this one made me smile.

In today’s Rasmussen daily presidential tracking poll, Barack Obama has hit his lowest approval index rating yet: -22. Can Bush territory be far off?

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Wednesday shows that 23% of the nation’s voters Strongly Approve of the way that Barack Obama is performing his role as president. Forty-five percent (45%) Strongly Disapprove, giving Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of -22. That’s the lowest Approval Index rating yet measured for this president.

Enthusiasm for the president among Democrats, which bounced following passage of the health care law, has faded again. Just 48% of those in the president’s party now Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance. That’s down from 65% earlier.


Among men, 50% strongly disapprove of Obama’s performance while 20% strongly approve; among women, the parallel split is 40/27. And this is less than 18 months into his first (and I hope only) term. I think W didn’t reach these “heights” until after Hurricane Katrina, a year into his second term. Way to go, O Lightworker!

Republicans shouldn’t break out the victory cigars for November just yet, however. While the poll shows lousy numbers for Obama, the Republican Party doesn’t fare much better:

Most Americans have “come to believe that the political system is broken, that most politicians are corrupt, and that neither major political party has the answers,” observes Scott Rasmussen. Just 27% believe Congress knows what it’s doing when it comes to the economy and 41% say that a group of people randomly selected from the phone book would do a better job than the current Congress.

The numbers are more reflective of a general anger at Washington, though Democrats are getting most of it since they have the majority in Congress and hold the White House – and, after more than a year since the last election, the public just isn’t buying the “Bush did it!” excuse anymore.

However, Republicans had control of Congress taken away from them in 2006 by a public that had grown sick and tired of them, too.  While the lack of progress in Iraq to that time was a large factor, Republicans also suffered because their core voters were disillusioned by their profligacy and corruption and stayed home or voted to give the other guy a turn. It’s only by comparison with the Democrats since 2007 (when they took control of Congress) and, especially, 2009 that the Elephants look good at all.

So, while the President’s tanking ratings should give them hope for change in the midterm elections, Republicans still have to convince the electorate that they’re once again worthy of trust. So far, they’re saying the right things and proposing good policy, and newer, younger leadership has energized their core voters. Whether they can make the sale in November remains to be seen, however, even if Obama’s polls don’t improve.