Call me naive, but…

Shouldn’t American buildings and civilians  coming under fire from across the Mexican border be considered just a wee bit newsworthy?

Several gunshots apparently fired from Juárez hit El Paso City Hall on Tuesday afternoon.

No one was hurt, but nerves were rattled at City Hall in what is thought to be the first cross-border gunfire during a drug war that has engulfed Juárez since 2008.

El Paso police spokesman Darrel Petry said investigators do not think City Hall was intentionally targeted but rather was struck by stray shots.

“It does appear the rounds may have come from an incident in Juárez,” Petry said.

City Hall, whose east and west sides are covered by glass windows, sits on a hill about a half-mile north of the Rio Grande.

About 4:50 p.m., city workers were going about a regular day when a bullet penetrated a ninth-floor west side window of the office of Assistant City Manager Pat Adauto.

Police said the bullet flew through the window, then through an interior wall before hitting a picture frame and stopping.

And this isn’t the only incident, as Big Journalism reports: UT Brownsville was closed for a weekend when shots came from across the border, and incidents are happening so often that the Texas Attorney General has complained to the Federal government. While these shootings are the results of drug wars in Mexico and not direct attacks on the US, it’s only a matter of time before Americans are seriously killed or injured. Mexico has effectively lost or is losing control of its northern border cities, which is endangering our citizens as well as theirs.

But this isn’t covered in the major media, nor does the Obama administration seem concerned. (As with so many things)  I’d ask if it will take someone’s death for them to notice, but that mattered little in the murder of an Arizona rancher, a story briefly in the news and now largely forgotten.

A news media worthy of the name would be all over these stories, bringing the public a true picture of the increasingly troubled situation on our border. A president worthy of his office would make it clear to his Mexican counterpart that, if he can’t control his own cities, we’ll do it for him.

Call me naive, but is it too much to expect our political and cultural leaders to do their jobs?

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10 Responses to Call me naive, but…

  1. MadAlfred says:

    Waffles is probably concerned that defending American soil from the Mexican drug cartels’ gang war might upset the potential Democratic voters who have yet to cross the border illegally.

  2. Jim says:

    We all know border security is being held hostage for immigration reform – a.k.a 20 million new Democrat voters. How does the President sleep at night? Maybe he has Michael Jackson’s former doctor helping him?

  3. Porkchop says:

    Gotta love the AK-47. More than half a mile away and it still has penetrating power.

    So you’re advocating invading and occupying Mexico as a solution? I’m sure we’ll be welcomed as liberators. Liberatos? Or are you advocating building a REALLY tall wall to block any stray gunfire? At least that would create jobs through government pork.

    As someone who grew up in the south and is no stranger to stray bullets, the only thing that makes this newsworthy is that the bullets came from Mexico. People get killed by stray bullets all the time in New Orleans, and that doesn’t make national news either… those are 100% domestic bullets. My favorite (or most horrific?) example was the tourist who was killed on the riverfront by a bullet someone had shot in the air to celebrate New Year’s. Always wear your helmet when you visit the Big Easy! And that was BEFORE it was destroyed by God in 2005.

    • Phineas Fahrquar says:

      “Gotta love the AK-47. More than half a mile away and it still has penetrating power. “

      I was chatting with a friend who lived there for many years (and he’s an avid shooter) and was doubtful of that story, but he was adamant that certain parts of the city near the border are a big risk. Not knowing much about firearms, I couldn’t say one way or the other.

      “So you’re advocating invading and occupying Mexico as a solution? I’m sure we’ll be welcomed as liberators. Liberatos?”

      “Libertadores,” I think. And no, I’m not advocating invasion or occupation – at least not until things get much worse. It didn’t work so well for General Pershing, either, just about a century ago. But I don’t think there’s any doubt that the situation in northern Mexico is becoming a much worse mess than in the past, and that the Mexican government has only tenuous control there, at best. Must we wait until another raid on Columbus before securing life and property from dangers from across the border?

      As far as fences go, I’m a believer in “good fences make good neighbors” and “a high fence with a wide gate.” (In other words, I like high levels of legal immigration.) A physical fence isn’t practical along long stretches of the border, but a combination of electronic sensors and Border Patrol forward operating bases (the modern day fort), which has been successfully tried in some areas, along with a stout physical fence where practical, would go a long way toward dealing with the illegal crossings problem. A sovereign nation has the right and the duty to control who crosses its borders, so this problem has to be dealt with lest we see our sovereignty derogated.

      As far as shots across the border go, we need to find some sort of incentives, positive and negative, to convince Mexico City to reassert control in places like Juarez and Reynosa.

      And for shots on this side of the border… I still remember living closer to downtown and hearing automatic weapons fire one 4th of July. Naturally, I stayed indoors. 🙂

  4. Porkchop says:

    “I was chatting with a friend who lived there for many years (and he’s an avid shooter) and was doubtful of that story”

    It certainly lies within the realm of possibility. Assuming an effective range of 1000 feet, having a stray go on a parabolic path for half a mile is pretty reasonable. Aimed, no, but stray, yep.

    “Must we wait until another raid on Columbus before securing life and property from dangers from across the border?”

    With the current administration, I’d suspect even that wouldn’t provoke an invasion.

    “As far as shots across the border go, we need to find some sort of incentives, positive and negative, to convince Mexico City to reassert control in places like Juarez and Reynosa.”

    That usually translates into foreign aid, right? I can’t see sending more taxpayer money down that chute. I’m sure the government would LIKE to control those areas, so it isn’t like they don’t already have incentive.

    “And for shots on this side of the border… I still remember living closer to downtown and hearing automatic weapons fire one 4th of July. Naturally, I stayed indoors.”

    In a bathtub, with your head covered by a cast-iron pan?

  5. […] on the border Following up on this post about the deteriorating security situation on our southern border, word comes that Mexican police have foiled an attempt to set up a Hizbullah […]

  6. […] have died since 2007, and I’ve written before about violence in Mexico’s northern border cities, as well as the possibility of it spilling over to our side. Secretary of State Clinton […]

  7. […] This isn’t the first time Americans in the El Paso area have come under fire, whether deliberately or accidentally. […]

  8. […] This isn’t the first time Americans in the El Paso area have come under fire, whether deliberately or accidentally. […]

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