Inconvenient study: La Niña killed coral reefs 4100 years ago and lasted over two millennia

From the article: ““It’s possible that anthropogenic climate change may once again be pushing these reefs towards another regional collapse.”

So a coral reef shutdown four thousand, one hundred years ago is a warning of the dangers from the Demon CO2 today, even though a) there was no anthropogenically generated CO2 back then and b) this all seems tied to la nina/el nino cycles? Check. (Note the weasel words “possible” and “may.”)

Watts Up With That?

From Georgia Tech and the “it’s your SUV that’s killing the coral reefs today, why can’t you get that through your head” department comes this inconvenient study.

La Nina-like conditions associated with 2,500-year-long shutdown of coral reef growth

coral-reef-panama A dead Pocillopora reef in Pacific Panamá. This image of interrupted reef growth represents what reefs throughout Pacific Panamá may have looked like when reef development shut down at the onset of the hiatus ~2,500 years ago. Credit: Lauren Toth

A new study has found that La Niña-like conditions in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Panamá were closely associated with an abrupt shutdown in coral reef growth that lasted 2,500 years. The study suggests that future changes in climate similar to those in the study could cause coral reefs to collapse in the future.

The study found cooler sea temperatures, greater precipitation and stronger upwelling — all indicators…

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