Financial system compromised by Iran deal

July 20, 2015

Yet more fall out from this miserable deal.

Money Jihad

The deal with Iran doesn’t just give a murderous regime $100 billion in sanctions relief.  It gives them ongoing access to the international financial system.  It will make their funding of Hezbollah, Hamas, and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps so much easier.  Expert analysis from Mark Dubowitz and Jonathan Schanzer writing in Foreign Policy last week:

It Just Got Easier for Iran to Fund Terrorism

Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, did not enter into Tuesday’s historic deal with six world powers to reset relations with the West. It was the promise of more than $100 billion in sanctions relief, rather, that greased the wheels of the recently completed diplomacy in Vienna. And though the windfall of cash will certainly strengthen its position, the real prize for Iran was regaining access to a little-known, but ubiquitous banking system that has been off-limits to the country since March 2012.

SWIFT, the…

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Another excuse for ‘the pause’ – it’s a ‘blip’ from volcanoes, or something

July 20, 2015

“It’s anything –ANYTHING!!– except solar cycles,” pleaded the desperate climate scientist who was beginning to realize he’d been wrong for over 20 years.

Watts Up With That?

From the University of Edinburgh:

Warming slow-down not the end of climate change, study shows

A slow-down in global warming is not a sign that climate change is ending, but a natural blip in an otherwise long-term upwards trend, research shows.

In a detailed study of more than 200 years’ worth of temperature data, results backed previous findings that short-term pauses in climate change are simply the result of natural variation.

The findings support the likelihood that a current hiatus in the world’s year-on-year temperature increases – which have stalled since 1998 – is temporary.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh analysed real-world historic climate records from 1782 to 2000, comparing them with computerised climate models for the same timescale.

They were able to separate the influence on climate trends of man-made warming – such as from greenhouse gas emissions – and of natural influences in temperature – such as…

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