A Jihadi lied??

October 1, 2009

When he was released from detention at Guantanamo Bay, al Qaeda terrorist refugee Fahd Saleh Suleiman al Jutayli swore that he would never return to jihad. As part of his reform, he was repatriated in 2006 to Saudi Arabia (the heartland of Islam and the jihad against the West) for reeducation.

After which he promptly got himself killed in Yemen… while waging jihad for al Qaeda.

A former Guantanamo detainee has reportedly been killed in a shootout between the Yemeni Army and Houthi rebels in northern Yemen. The former detainee, Fahd Saleh Suleiman al Jutayli, was captured in Pakistan after fleeing the Tora Bora Mountains in 2001. He was repatriated to his native Saudi Arabia in May 2006.

According to the Yemen Post, two other former Gitmo detainees – Yusuf al Shehri and Othman al Ghamdi – called their families to tell them Jutayli had been killed in the fighting and asked them to inform Jutayli’s family.

Earlier this year, the Saudi government included all three of these former Guantanamo detainees – Jutayli, Shehri, and Ghamdi – on a list of the Kingdom’s 85 most wanted terrorists. After being released from Guantanamo, the three graduated from Saudi Arabia’s rehabilitation program and joined eight other former Gitmo detainees in fleeing south to Yemen. All eleven joined al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula.

The escape of the eleven former Gitmo detainees from Saudi Arabia was reportedly organized by still other Gitmo veterans. Writing in the May 2009 issue of the CTC Sentinel, Dr. Christopher Boucek, an associate in the Middle East Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, said that Saudi officials found their disappearance “was well-coordinated in advance.” Their escape “was allegedly coordinated with other non-Saudi former Guantanamo detainees who have been repatriated to other countries, indicating that returnees have maintained ties from Guantanamo,” Boucek reported.

(Emphases added)

His escape may not have been all that difficult to arrange: remember that Saudi Arabia is one of the ideological and financial fountainheads for the modern jihadist movement, and was the origin of 15 of the 19 September 11th hijackers. Al Jutayli himself was called to jihad by an instructor at a Saudi university:

According to documents produced at Guantanamo, US intelligence officials found that Jutayli was recruited by the notorious Saudi Sheikh Ha Al Uqla to wage jihad in “Kashmir, Pakistan or Chechnya.” Jutayli “joined the Taliban after receiving a Fatwa from Sheik Ha Al Uqla at the Immam Muhammad Bin Saud College in Burayda, Saudi Arabia.”

Sheikh Uqla, “who issued fatwahs and encouraged people to fight jihad against Christians and Jews” and condoned the September 11 attacks, allegedly facilitated Jutayli’s trip to Afghanistan in 2001.

In Afghanistan, Jutayli trained with al Qaeda before being captured by US forces. As al Qaeda is a religious movement, his training surely included religious indoctrination in Salafist Islam. Part of this instruction surely included the doctrine of taqiyya, or permissible lying:

{A} problem concerning law and order {with respect to Muslims in dar al-harb} arises from an ancient Islamic legal principle — that of taqiyya, a word the root meaning of which is “to remain faithful” but which in effect means “dissimulation.” It has full Quranic authority (3:28 and 16:106) and allows the Muslim to conform outwardly to the requirements of unislamic or non-Islamic government, while inwardly “remaining faithful” to whatever he conceives to be proper Islam, while waiting for the tide to turn. (Hiskett,Some to Mecca Turn to Pray, 101.)

Volume 4, Book 52, Number 269; Narrated Jabir bin ‘Abdullah: The Prophet said, “War is deceit.”

(Emphasis added)

“Dar al-harb” means “House of War,” that is, that portion of the world not governed by Islam and under sharia law. The whole essay at the above link is worth reading.

But, back to the fruitcake psychopath honored martyr, Mr. Jutayli, what were the interrogators at Guantanamo (or those above them) thinking when they released him back to Saudi Arabia? Did they honestly think he had reformed or been deprogrammed, that he was telling the truth when he said he would not return to jihad? If so, they’re woefully ignorant or dismissive of Islamic doctrine and its hold over the jihadi. Or was this a case of cynicism in action: “He’s a minor player. Let the Saudis take care of him?” That would have meant ignoring both the role of Saudi Arabia itself in supporting jihad and the spiritual rejuvenation a committed Salafist would feel upon returning to the Land of the Two Holy Places – it would be a reward for his practice of taqiyya.

Al Jutayli’s case is just one of many concerning terrorists held at Guantanamo who return to jihad on their release, regardless of any promises they made or assurances they gave. They are soldiers in a holy war, fighting that war is their religious duty, and deceiving the enemy is a praiseworthy act of devotion. There may be reasons to release one or another detained jihadi, but don’t be surprised when they turn up again, rifle in hand.

LINKS: More from Fausta.


The euphemism administration

September 28, 2009

So now the detainees at Guantanamo Bay aren’t jihadis, they’re not terrorists, they’re not Islamists … they’re not even “detainees.”

No, they’re refugees. I’m not kidding.

Then again, what else would you expect from an administration that refers to a war as an “overseas contingency operation?”

What’s a good euphemism for “losers?” Loser