Journalism Dean: “There are limits to free speech”

January 21, 2015
"Free speech means the freedom to offend."

“Free speech means the freedom to offend.”

It’s a measure of how craven and corrupt our political culture has become that even the Dean of a journalism school in a nation founded on free speech and freedom of the press should say “there are limits, however:”

Charlie Hebdo has gone too far.

In its first publication following the Jan. 7 attack on its Paris office, in which two Muslim gunmen massacred 12 people, the once little-known French satirical news weekly crossed the line that separates free speech from toxic talk.

Charlie Hebdo’s latest depiction of the prophet Mohammed — a repeat of the very action that is thought to have sparked the murderous attack on its office — predictably has given rise to widespread violence in nations with large Muslim populations. Its irreverence of Mohammed once moved the French tabloid to portray him naked in a pornographic pose. In another caricature, it showed Mohammed being beheaded by a member of the Islamic State.

While free speech is one of democracy’s most important pillars, it has its limits.

So says DeWayne Wickham, Dean of the School of Global Journalism and Communication at Wayne State University. In a very limited sense, he’s right: I cannot go yelling “fire!” in a crowded theater (1), for example (2). Nor can I incite to violence by, for example, standing before a crowd and telling them to go now and beat up a certain person or persons.

But that’s it. All other political speech is within bounds, regardless of whom it offends. You cannot have a free society unless the it includes the right to freely criticize those in authority — and not just criticize, but to satirize and mock, too. If I as a Catholic want to question Original Sin and the need for Divine Grace, or that Jesus was not Divine until adopted by God, then the Church might well denounce me as a heretic and excommunicate me, but the law cannot punish me for my beliefs, nor should I fear physical violence. If I want to be truly outrageous and place the Crucifix in a beaker of urine, I would be a jackass, but I still should not have to fear either legal sanction nor physical violence.

And the same is true of any religion. If I want to question Muhammad’s status as a prophet, or even if he existed at all; if I want to argue that his earliest biography shows he was a bandit, a warlord, and a torturer; and if I want to criticize Sharia, Islam’s divine law, for calling for the execution of homosexuals, that is my right as a free man — even if I want to draw questionably funny satirical cartoons.

This is the right of any human being and well-within the “limits” of free speech.

Let’s be honest. It’s not a regard for the proper limits of free speech that motivates Mr. Wickham. If he or one of his students offended some Amish who then complained, I’m willing to bet he’d be on his soapbox screaming about “free speech” and “freedom of the press.”

And that leads us to the truth. Amish might shun you. Catholics won’t invite you to Bingo Night. A Buddhist would probably just decide you’re an annoying illusion and don’t really exist.

But all too many Muslims would be quite willing to kill you for insulting their Muhammad. Just ask the cartoonists at Charlie Hebdo, or Theo van Gogh.

The limit to Dean Wickham’s freedom of speech is his fear of punishment, and thus he is not free at all.

via Michael Walsh

Footnote:
(1) Popehat points out the serious flaws with that particular justification for censorship.
(2) When it’s not true, that is.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)

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Hollywood fears the fatwa

November 15, 2009

With the release 2012, Islamist Watch wonders why the film shows holy places being destroyed around the globe – except Mecca.

“Who will survive 2012?” asks a website promoting Roland Emmerich’s new end-of-the-world film set three years from now. The answer: Muslims — or at least their cherished holy places:

For his latest disaster movie, 2012, the 53-year-old director had wanted to demolish the Kaaba, the iconic cube-shaped structure in the Grand Mosque in Mecca. …

But after some consideration, he decided it might not be such a smart idea, after all.

“I wanted to do that, I have to admit,” Emmerich told SciFiWire.com. “But my co-writer Harald [Kloser] said I will not have a fatwa on my head because of a movie. And he was right.”

Have a look to see how else Hollywood has gone out of its way to avoid offending Muslims, but shows no such concern for other religions, and learn why David Rusin rates Hollywood a D for Dhimmitude.


Yet another reason why I could never be Muslim

October 2, 2009

Hawt Brazilian female dancers are scary:

Lebanese Muslims scared of sexy Brazilian samba dancers

A group of Lebanese Muslim scholars on Thursday forced the cancellation of a planned performance by a Brazilian samba troupe in the southern coastal city of Tyre on moral and religious grounds.

“This is a pornographic dance group that goes against our ethics,” Sheikh Ali Yassin, one of 50 religious leaders who had called for the cancellation, told AFP.

“We fear that once they start dancing nude in the streets, there will be trouble,” Yassin added. “Our society will not accept such a parade.

Fear not, O Sheikh. So that ye not be afraid, I am willing to have the scary dancers perform at my home, instead of in your city. For, Lo! Phineas is merciful, wise. And not at all terrified of scantily-clad Brazilian babes.

brazil_carnival

Yep. Pretty darned scary.

(hat tip: The Jawa Report)