Election Day +1: about last night

November 5, 2014

That was quite a night last night, wasn’t it?

Pardon me, I know it’s immature, but I’ve waited a long while to do this:

BWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!!

smiley dance smiley cheering smiley thumbs up smiley loser smiley cool hey babe  smiley devil smiley big grin

 

Whew. There. I feel better now. smiley blush

Anyway, let’s review what happened in the Great Shellacking Part II (1), courtesy of those fine fellows at Real Clear Politics. Click the links for larger, updated versions:

First, the Senate. It was beautiful:

Senate 2014

Not only did the Republicans wrest control of the Senate from that vile wretch Harry Reid, but they added plenty of seats to give themselves a cushion for 2016, when many of their own seats will be up for grabs. Things officially stand at a net gain of 7, but with Alaska all but officially a Sullivan victory and Mary Landrieu an almost certain dead duck in the coming runoff, I fully expect a final number of plus-9. That, my friends, is not just a wave, but a tsunami. And with Senator Angus King of Maine (I) sure to seek the best deal he can get, expect an effect 55-45 Republican majority for the next two years.

I had predicted plus-8, but I am happy to be wrong. I was also wrong about my surprise pick, expecting Scott Brown to win in New Hampshire. While I’m sorry to see he didn’t, I was overjoyed at Thom Tillis beating the corrupt incumbent, Kay Hagan, in North Carolina. Congratulations to my blog buddy Sister Toldjah for pulling it off. She and a lot of Carolina conservatives worked their fannies off for this win, and I couldn’t be more thrilled for them.

I was also happy to see State Senator Joni Ernst beat the laughable Bruce Braley in Iowa and Rep. Cory Gardner defeat the monomaniacal Senator Uterus Udall in Colorado.

The schadenfreude was sweet, my friends.

Then, the House. Biggest Republican majority since at least 1946 (some say 1928):

House 2014

Plus-13 for the majority party in an era when both parties are despised seems amazing to me, but the Republicans pulled it off. And they may pick up a few more, depending on how a few close California (!) races shake out. Well done, Nancy Pelosi! I hope they keep you in the Minority Leader’s job for years to come.

And finally, the gubernatorial races, which held some pleasant shockers:

Governors 2014

Amazingly, the Republicans held Kansas (handily) and Florida when both incumbents had been almost given up for dead, and picked up Arkansas, Massachusetts (!), Maryland (!!), and Illinois (!!!), losing only Pennsylvania. That gives the Republicans 31 governors, which may be the largest in decades.

Now, with all that good news, the question remains, what do the Republicans do?

Naturally, like any good self-important blogger, I have some advice for the respective caucuses.

First, do NOT impeach Barack Obama. Seriously. Unless he ax-murders a convent full of nuns and orphans on national TV or declares himself Emperor, just forget it. The nation did not elect you to overturn the 2012 election, and no national consensus exists for his removal, a political prerequisite for successful impeachment and removal. Democrats may be shell-shocked after what just happened, but, I guarantee you there will be no way to get the needed crossover votes for removal. I agree he richly deserves impeachment, but it would be wasted effort and a self-inflicted wound for our side. If you want to prove to the public that all their worst fears about irresponsible politicians are true, you would find no better way than jumping foaming at the mouth on an impeachment bandwagon.

And it would be just what Obama and his Alinskyite allies would want.

But that does not mean we cannot play hardball with Obama. Republicans should put him on the spot by passing good, sensible measures –such as approving the Keystone XL pipeline– that have real benefits for the average American, and then dare The One to veto them. We may not be able to override those vetoes, but, with his shield-bearer in the Senate, Harry Reid, now in the minority, he won’t be able to hide from tough decisions any longer. Go ahead, repeal Obamacare and replace it with a good free-market solution. Open up drilling off our coasts. Relax coal regulations and thus lower energy prices for the masses. Pass one good measure after another and force Obama to either take an unpopular stand or acquiesce, thus frustrating his core supporters.

Just keep in mind we won’t be able to override most vetoes. That doesn’t mean we don’t fight, but don’t expect much in the way of positive policy results until (we hope) we have control of both Congress and the presidency in 2017.

The same with Obama and executive actions. The presidency is powerful (perhaps too powerful) and Obama can do a lot with his infamous phone and pen. But now, with control of both chambers, Congress can make statist bureaucrats’ lives miserable with hearings and public exposure, as well as educational budget cuts (2). Congress’ investigatory and budget powers are among its most powerful weapons for reining in the Executive. Don’t be afraid to use them.

Just use them judiciously, with wisdom and prudence. Do that, and the people will be ready for real hope and change in the White House in 2016.

But also feel free to bask for a bit in the afterglow of that wonderful night last night.

Footnotes:
(1) For my comments on the Great Shellacking Part I, go here.
(2) Which will much more effective now that we have both chambers of Congress and don’t have to deal with Harry “We’re not votin’ on nuthin'” Reid.

RELATED: Yuval Levin on the right agenda for a Republican congress.

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Election Day: “Forth, and fear no darkness!”

November 4, 2014

Today is it, folks. The day of decision. After six years of being governed by the most left-wing administration in US History, as well as the most feckless since James Buchanan; after six years of suffering under incompetent boobs (save for their outstanding competence at corruption and cronyism) who treat the Constitution and the Rule of Law like a twenty-dollar hooker; after six appalling years that weakened the nation, abased us before our enemies, and betrayed our allies; after all that, we get our say.

I’ve been thinking of how to describe my mood this day, a mood of both determination and elation, of standing on the verge of liberation. And it came to me that mere words wouldn’t do, but that a film clip (1) would capture it perfectly:

We have them on the run, folks. They’re nervous, ready to break. But now is not the time to let up. If you haven’t voted yet, then turn off the computer and get off your duff and vote! For a Republican Senate, for Minority Leader Harry Reid, and the Founders’ America. Its time to send the Progressives howling, back into the wilderness. An informed and determined freeborn citizen is what they fear. Remind them of why. Go. Vote.

Forth, and fear no darkness!

PS:  I’m sure there are those who will see all sorts of “racist dog whistles” in this post. (“He said ‘darkness!’ I must tweet Chris Matthews about this!”) That’s your problem. I happen to be a big Lord of the Rings fan, and that scene is the greatest cavalry charge in movie history. Ever. And it reflects perfectly how I feel about today.

PPS: This is a reposting of my election day post from 2012, slightly altered for today. Plus, it’s a great excuse to use that clip again. 🙂

Footnote:
(1)The first minute or so can be seen (kinda sorta) as a metaphor of the last six years, starting on election night, 2008. But once the horns blow, that’s today, baby. Charge!

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Their tears are like the finest liqueur

November 19, 2010

I admit, I’m enjoying this:

Dejected Democrats wiped away tears on the House floor Monday night while Republicans congratulated themselves on winning back control of the lower chamber.

(…)

Freshman Rep. Debbie Halvorson (D-Ill.), who lost her reelection bid, wiped away tears as she hugged fellow members of the class of 2008, many of whom lost on Nov. 2.

Less than three feet away, ousted Nevada freshman Rep. Dina Titus (D) appeared to brush away some tears in a less obvious manner.

Ladies, after the crap your party inflicted on the nation over the last two years, you got what you deserved, so cry me a river.

While I laugh.

Via Allahpundit.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


A sea of red

November 3, 2010

Take a look at this graphic from yesterday’s results in House races:

(Click the image for a larger view. Source.)

That is a bloodbath. With a few scattered exceptions, the Democrats are reduced to their coastal and big urban enclaves; but they’ve lost the vast middle, especially states like Ohio and Pennsylvania, which are crucial to Obama’s reelection hopes in 2012.

Impressive.


Refudiation Day +1: the national view

November 3, 2010

(This is the first of two posts on yesterday’s election. This one deals with the overall results, while the next will focus on California.)

Forget any the spin coming from the Democrats and their allies on the Left. And you Righties put down your disappointment that Republicans didn’t sweep all before them. An honest look at the results tells us one indisputable fact: last night was a great night and a near-total rejection of the (Social) Democratic agenda and their anti-Constitutional means of pursuing it. In the results so far, the Republicans have gained 60 seats in the House (11 outstanding), for the biggest win by any party since 1948. And they knocked off several powerful committee chairmen. Minority Leader and Speaker-in-Waiting John Boehner struck the right tone in his victory speech, even getting a bit emotional toward the end:

Boehner has it right: Republicans won, but largely because the Democrats scared the Hell out of the electorate. They now have to prove they’re worthy of the second chance the public has given them.

In the Senate, the Republicans have so far gained six seats, a good result in any year, but, honestly, a bit disappointing nonetheless. Colorado may go to a recount and Alaska may take days or weeks to resolve (“Write in” currently leads). A Murkowski win there would be a black eye for Sarah Palin, a longtime foe of the Murkowski family. Disappointments include West Virginia, California, Nevada, and maybe Colorado and Washington, though those are too close to call and may go to recounts. Losing the first three killed any realistic chance to flip the Senate.

On the bright side, though, were several nice wins: Ron Johnson upended Russ Feingold in Wisconsin, in a big victory for the 1st amendment (Feingold was one-half of the execrable McCain-Feingold campaign “reform” act.) Mark Kirk defeated Mob banker Alexi Giannoulias in Illinois; because this was also a special election, Kirk takes his seat immediately, reinforcing our side in the event a filibuster is necessary to stop any stupid legislation from passing during the coming lame-duck session. Pat Toomey won a close race in Pennsylvania, bring a voice of fiscal sanity to the Upper Chamber.

Perhaps the most promising win last night, though was that of Marco Rubio in Florida, for two reasons. First, it was the final nail in the coffin of Charlie Crist, the Governor of Florida who revealed himself to be free of any sense of honor, principle, or even shame. Good riddance.

However, it’s even better because of Rubio, himself. He has a fantastic personal story, his principles are good (and he sticks to them), he’s intelligent, and the man gives one helluva good speech. Here’s his victory address from last night:

Republicans also managed to capture many governorships (22 of 37 races, with 6 to go) and legislatures, some of the latter for the first time since Reconstruction. (And congratulations to my blog-buddy Sister Toldjah for the Republican takeover of the North Carolina legislature for the first time since 1898. We know you were the secret power behind it all.  ) These results are important not only for the individual states themselves, but also for redistricting in the wake of the 2010 census. (Yes, I know I’ve railed against gerrymandering in the past, and I still loathe it, but, if those are the bad rules in place, we might as well put them to good ends.)

So, what does this mean for the future? For the Republicans, as Ed Morrissey writes, they’re on probation. The new class, with a strong majority in the House and a strengthened minority (and chastened Democratic majority, perhaps) in the Senate, has a mandate to reign in spending, debt, and the growth of intrusive government. They may be able to accomplish some of this, but I wouldn’t expect many legislative accomplishments on all but the most bipartisan issues. And were they able to pass, for example, a repeal of ObamaCare, they wouldn’t be able to override a veto.

A more reasonable expectation is for the Republican caucuses to act as a break on the progressive-statist agenda, stifling new measures and slowing down the implementation of what’s been passed, perhaps through a refusal to provide funds. However, I also expect Obama to pursue his radical agenda through the bureaucracy, via administrative regulation and executive order, now that he’s effectively lost Congress. He’s not the skilled political triangulator that Clinton was; he’s an ideologue whose goal is the fundamental transformation of the United States in a democratic-socialist direction.

In other words, with renewed Republican caucuses that have markedly shifted to the Right toward small-government, free-market politics and a president who’s whole political life has been on the the far Left and whose arrogance inclines him against compromise… Well, let’s say I think gridlock might be the most likely result. And that wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing, for it means Cap-and-Trade and Card Check are dead.

So, consider this step one. Step two is in 2012, when we finish the job.


Election Day: a Red Day

November 2, 2010

Today is Election Day in the United States, a day many of us have been looking forward to for 24 long months, while others have been dreading it for about 18.

I could go on a rant about how the Democrats and their Leftist allies have screwed up: the arrogance, the contempt for their fellow Americans, the thuggery, the weakness before our enemies, the anti-constitutionalism, the mind-numbingly stupid economic policies…  To borrow a phrase, “it’s a target-rich environment.”

But I won’t, for most people have already made up their minds. Instead, I want to thank the professional Democrats and their (barely disguised) socialist backers.

Yes, thank you, Democrats. Because, in the two years since Barack Obama won the Presidency and the Democratic Congress was freed of any institutional constraint, you have shown the nation what unrestrained Progressivism looks like – and we’ve been scared straight. You’ve acted like teenagers with Daddy’s credit card and your first bottle of whiskey, and now the adults are about to come home and slap you silly. You’ve done such a bang up job at screwing up that no one other than the most drooling, unthinking Obamaton will ever support big government and Keynesian policies again, probably for the next several generations. And you’ve made the job of small government, free market advocates much, much easier.

Thank you.

To my fellow Center-Righties and my brethren on the Right, Center, and practical Center-Left (who are probably appalled at their own side at the moment), I offer a hand of friendship and alliance to save the nation we love. The Left, which has taken over the Democratic Party, is not our enemy in the way bin Laden and his crew are, but they are our foes, and they are doing great harm to the United States of America. Let us join together today and vote them out of office, top to bottom along the whole ticket. Show no mercy. You may like your local congressman or senator, but remember that person probably voted to empower Nancy Pelosi or backed Harry Reid.

That alone should be damning enough. They all have to go.

For inspiration, I’ll leave you with this clip from The Lord of the Rings, which I think captures the spirit of this day*. You can probably guess which sides I think the Orcs and the Rohirrim represent.

Forth, and fear no Darkness!

*Oh heck, I just love this scene. It’s the greatest movie cavalry charge of all time.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Sarah Palin vs. the Tyrant Murkowski

October 30, 2010

Last I recall, a Senator of the United States, even one who got her seat as a gift from Daddy, swears the following oath:

I do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office on which I am about to enter: So help me God.

And that support and defense includes supporting and defending the amendments to said Constitution, including the 1st Amendment, which reads:

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

(Emphases added)

So, when a sitting senator, through her underlings, uses the threat of a federal investigation to drive a critical radio host off the air*, is she not violating that oath six ways from Sunday, in spirit if not in letter?

Sarah Palin thinks so, and it’s made her mad:

Yesterday, Lisa Murkowski’s hired guns threatened radio host Dan Fagan, and more importantly, the station that airs Fagan’s show, with legal action for allegedly illegal “electioneering.” The station, unlike Murkowski, who is flush with millions of dollars from vested corporate interests, does not have a budget for a legal defense. So it did what any small market station would do when threatened by Beltway lawyers charging $500 to $1000 an hour – they pulled Dan Fagan off the air.

Does all this sound heavy handed? It is. It is an interference with Dan Fagan’s constitutional right to free speech. It is also a shocking indictment against Lisa Murkowski. How low will she go to hold onto power? First, she gets the Division of Elections to change its write-in process – a process that Judge Pfiffner correctly determined had been in place without change for 50 years. She is accepting financial support from federal contractors, an act that is highly questionable and now pending before the FEC. And today, she played her last card. She made it clear that if you disagree with her and encourage others to exercise their civic rights, she’ll take you off the air.

The concept of “electioneering” involves several issues, but typically refers to campaigning at the polls, which is appropriately banned. Under federal law, it can also mean paying for advertising on broadcast media during a federal election cycle, and it requires disclosures if done by groups and corporations. Fagan used satire to mock Murkowski’s write-in efforts and encouraged Alaskans to run as write-in candidates. That is not illegal. That is free speech.

(Emphasis added)

With her attitude toward opponents’ free speech, I’m sure Princess Lisa would fit right in with the Obama administration.

Go, ‘Cuda.

*(Yeah, I know the guy who made the complaint is “just” a Murkowski volunteer and the campaign denies any connection. If you believe that, perhaps you’d like to buy this lovely bridge, too.)

LINKS: Ed Morrissey connects this to the debate over the possible return of the Fairness Doctrine.