Congresswoman to Congress: “Go to Hell!”

April 7, 2011

Eleanor Holmes Norton is the non-voting Delegate to the House of Representatives for the District of Columbia. Even though she cannot vote, she serves as Washington’s representative. She is also a dyed-in-the-wool progressive Democrat and a fan of spending. So, when the Republicans propose to eliminate the use of all government funds for abortion in the District, she gets a wee bit upset:

The Democratic non-voting representative for the District of Columbia told MyFoxDC.com that Congress should go “straight to hell” for trying to meddle in D.C. affairs.

Norton was referring to a provision in the stopgap budget bill House Republicans are pushing that would ban federal and local taxpayer dollars in the District of Columbia from being used to pay for abortions.

“We are absolutely outraged. This is the functional equivalent of bombing innocent civilians,” she said, according to MyFoxDC.com. “It’s time that the District of Columbia told the Congress to go straight to hell.”

Gotta love that “new tone,” eh?

Let’s set aside the laughable and fatuous hyperbole required to compare a budgetary decision to what Qaddafi has been doing in Libya. That’s par for the Democrats’ course. When it comes to “meddling in D.C. affairs,” however, Holmes needs to review the history of the district she represents. Article I, section 8 of the Constitution reads, in part:

To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings;

Said district was created by the Residence Act of 1790, based on the cession of lands by Maryland and Virginia. The Government of the district was established by the Organic Act of 1801 and amended in the Organic Act of 1871. Both these acts (the latter of which is still in force, I believe) were enacted by Congress in pursuance of their powers under the Constitution. Far from meddling where they don’t belong, they have a specific charge under our most basic law to involve themselves in D.C. affairs, including the manner in which local money is spent.

Before she next decides to blow off steam, perhaps Delegate Norton should take the time to review the proper role of the chamber in which she serves — which includes supervising D.C., not funding abortion — and the law regarding the district she supposedly represents.

Unless, of course, she likes making herself look foolish and ignorant.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)

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