Mexican police chief did indeed flee to the US

March 9, 2011

A few days ago I wrote about the disappearance of Marisol Valles García, who at 21 was the youngest police chief in Mexico. Subsequent news articles claimed she had vanished or walked off her job, but few were willing to credit the idea that she had sought asylum north of the border. Understandable; it would be a little embarrassing for Mexico, if true.

Well, it is true:

After fleeing Mexico to request asylum, the young police chief of the Juárez Valley was
released from a detention center in El Paso and moved north of the U.S. border, officials said Tuesday.

The location of Marisol Valles García, 21, and her family is not being disclosed.

“Marisol Valles García is in the United States,and she will have the opportunity to present the facts of her case before an impartial immigration judge,” said an official with Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

It’s never a good sign when a police chief has to flee for his or her life, but, given the short life expectancy of Mexican chiefs of police these days, I don’t blame Valles Garcia at all.

via Borderland Beat


From illegal aliens to refugees?

April 5, 2010

If this FOX News story represents a trend, the US could soon face a flood of refugees seeking to escape the breakdown of law and order south of the Border:

The spreading violence of the drug wars along the Mexican border may have one unintended consequence. It could upend efforts to curb illegal immigrants by giving Mexican border-crossers a tool they never had before: a valid claim for political asylum.

For decades, immigrants coming from Mexico were denied asylum because Mexico was a stable and relatively peaceful democracy. But that is changing now.

Last week, at least 30 Mexicans from the town of El Porvenir walked to the border crossing post at Fort Hancock, Texas, and asked for political asylum. Ordinarily, their claim would be denied as groundless, and they would be turned back. Instead, they were taken to El Paso, where they expect to have their cases heard.

No one doubts that they have a strong claim. Their town on the Mexican side of the border is under siege by one or more drug cartels battling for control of the key border crossing. According to Mike Doyle, the chief deputy sheriff of Hudspeth County, Texas, one of the cartels has ordered all residents of the town of 10,000 to abandon the city within the next month.

“They came in and put up a sign in the plaza telling everyone to leave or pay with their own blood,” Doyle said. Since then there has been a steady stream of El Porvenir residents seeking safety on the American side of the border, both legally and illegally. Among them are the 30 who are seeking political asylum.

Mexico has had a serious problem with the drug cartels since the mid-80s, and government corruption has only exacerbated it. Now it seems that the writ of the government itself is in danger of collapsing in its northern border area. The federal government has been reluctant to deal firmly with the illegal alien problem for decades, but a refugee crisis and areas controlled by narco-bandits next to our southwestern states may finally force it to face reality: border security is beyond doubt within the duties and powers of the government.

RELATED: Is Mexico on the way to being a failed state?