You know that ObamaCare is in deep trouble

March 1, 2012

When even 56% of Democrats think it’s unconstitutional.

That’s a real achievement you have there, Barry, Nancy, and Harry. Genuine bipartisanship!


I know some people hate polls…

May 26, 2010

But they do make good blog-fodder when time is short. Besides, this one made me smile.

In today’s Rasmussen daily presidential tracking poll, Barack Obama has hit his lowest approval index rating yet: -22. Can Bush territory be far off?

The Rasmussen Reports daily Presidential Tracking Poll for Wednesday shows that 23% of the nation’s voters Strongly Approve of the way that Barack Obama is performing his role as president. Forty-five percent (45%) Strongly Disapprove, giving Obama a Presidential Approval Index rating of -22. That’s the lowest Approval Index rating yet measured for this president.

Enthusiasm for the president among Democrats, which bounced following passage of the health care law, has faded again. Just 48% of those in the president’s party now Strongly Approve of Obama’s performance. That’s down from 65% earlier.


Among men, 50% strongly disapprove of Obama’s performance while 20% strongly approve; among women, the parallel split is 40/27. And this is less than 18 months into his first (and I hope only) term. I think W didn’t reach these “heights” until after Hurricane Katrina, a year into his second term. Way to go, O Lightworker!

Republicans shouldn’t break out the victory cigars for November just yet, however. While the poll shows lousy numbers for Obama, the Republican Party doesn’t fare much better:

Most Americans have “come to believe that the political system is broken, that most politicians are corrupt, and that neither major political party has the answers,” observes Scott Rasmussen. Just 27% believe Congress knows what it’s doing when it comes to the economy and 41% say that a group of people randomly selected from the phone book would do a better job than the current Congress.

The numbers are more reflective of a general anger at Washington, though Democrats are getting most of it since they have the majority in Congress and hold the White House – and, after more than a year since the last election, the public just isn’t buying the “Bush did it!” excuse anymore.

However, Republicans had control of Congress taken away from them in 2006 by a public that had grown sick and tired of them, too.  While the lack of progress in Iraq to that time was a large factor, Republicans also suffered because their core voters were disillusioned by their profligacy and corruption and stayed home or voted to give the other guy a turn. It’s only by comparison with the Democrats since 2007 (when they took control of Congress) and, especially, 2009 that the Elephants look good at all.

So, while the President’s tanking ratings should give them hope for change in the midterm elections, Republicans still have to convince the electorate that they’re once again worthy of trust. So far, they’re saying the right things and proposing good policy, and newer, younger leadership has energized their core voters. Whether they can make the sale in November remains to be seen, however, even if Obama’s polls don’t improve.


America gives its opinion of Congress

March 29, 2010

The Pew Research Center asked people to give a one-word impression of Congress, from which they built a word cloud. The size of a word relates to its frequency. Behold the result:

Vox populi, vox Dei.  Rolling on the floor

(via: American Thinker and International Liberty)


We’ll learn to love it over time, I’m sure

March 23, 2010

Now that Congress and the White House have finished spending over a year doing what’s good for us whether we want it or not, they’re sure to bask in public approval, right? Now that they’ve passed health-care reform and we can learn what’s in Santa’s bag Pandora’s box the bill, we’re all going to be grateful in the end, right?

Er… Maybe not.

A majority of Americans have a dim view of the sweeping health care bill passed by the House, saying it gives Washington too much clout and won’t do much to reduce their own health care costs or federal deficits, according to a new poll released Monday.

A CNN/Opinion Research Corporation poll found that 59 percent of those surveyed opposed the bill, and 39 percent favored it. All of the interviews were conducted before the House voted Sunday night, but the contents of the bill were widely known.

In addition, 56 percent said the bill gives the government too much involvement in health care; 28 percent said it gives the government the proper role and 16 percent said it leaves Washington with an inadequate role.

On the question of costs, 62 percent said the bill increases the amount of money they personally spend on health care; 21 percent said their costs would remain the same and 16 percent said they would decrease.

Note that this poll is from CNN, an organization not known for being critical or even objective about Obama and the progressive agenda.

I wonder how many Democrats will be holding townhall meetings to bask in the accolades of their grateful constituents over the Easter recess?

Yeah, me too.

UPDATE: We’re so happy with this bill that 49% of likely voters want their states to sue to stop it.


That’s gotta hurt

December 13, 2009

Granted, poll numbers can change rapidly and it’s a long way from November, 2012, but these new poll numbers for President Obama are just ugly:

Maybe he should ask Phil Jones how to hide this decline, too.

Has there ever been a president whose ratings have fallen this far, this fast, in his first year?

The internals of the poll are no better for Obama: It’s not surprising that 69% of self-declared Republicans strongly disapprove of him, but having only 41% of Democrats strongly approve cannot be comforting. And among independents, whom Obama won last November, his strongly approve/disapprove numbers are 21%/49%.

What about the issues? Well, public opinion on the economy ought to have the President hiding under his bed: when asked about Obama’s performance on fiscal matters, 1% strongly approve and 81% strongly disapprove. If he follows through on having the EPA issue economy-killing regulations to control carbon-dioxide and the congressional Democrats ram through a budget-busting health care plan, expect those numbers to get even worse for The One.

Democrats in Congress have to be worried, too. Midterm elections are often a referendum on the White House’s policies, but representatives and senators are the ones who get punished by being fired by the voters. While Congress is decidedly unpopular already, Obama could turn out to be a drag on their already shaky chances.

Like I said, it’s just one poll, but it’s been part of a steady trend observed by both Rasmussen and other pollsters. If Democrats hope to avoid a massacre in 2010 and reelect Obama in 2012, they need to change their own policy course, starting now.


In other words, they were lying

December 1, 2009

Byron York looks at the Democratic discomfort over President Obama’s (grudging) decision to sent 30-34,000 more troops to Afghanistan and comes to a conclusion: when they all said during the campaign that the war in Afghanistan was the good war they could support, they lied:

Other top Democrats adopted the get-tough approach, at least when it came time to campaign.  In September 2006, as she was leading the effort that would result in Democrats taking over the House and her becoming speaker, Rep. Nancy Pelosi said George W. Bush “took his eye off the ball” in Afghanistan. “We had a presence over there the past few years, but not to the extent that we needed to get the job done,” Pelosi said. The phrase “took his eye off the ball” became a Democratic mantra about the supposed neglect of Afghanistan — a situation that would be remedied by electing ready-to-fight Democrats.

But now, with Democrats in charge of the entire U.S. government and George Bush nowhere to be found, Pelosi and others in her party are suddenly very, very worried about U.S. escalation in Afghanistan.  “There is serious unrest in our caucus,” the speaker said recently.  There is so much unrest that Democrats who show little concern about the tripling of already-large budget deficits say they’re worried about the rising cost of the war.

It is in that atmosphere that Obama makes his West Point speech.  He had to make certain promises to get elected.  Unlike some of his supporters, he has to remember those promises now that he is in office.  So he is sending more troops.  But he still can’t tell the truth about so many Democratic pledges to support the war in Afghanistan: They didn’t mean it.

And then they wonder why so many people don’t take the Democrats seriously when it comes to national security.


Poll: Did President Obama change your mind on health care?

September 10, 2009

So, after last night’s desperate attempt speech by the President to sell the Democrats’ plan for health-care reform, I thought it would be fun to see what reactions you all had. So….

Feel free to elaborate on your vote in the comments.


Happy Labor Day!

September 7, 2009

Any day off is a happy day. 🙂

Meanwhile, Byron York reports that support for labor unions is at an all-time low:

This Labor Day brings word of a new Gallup poll showing that American public support for labor unions has taken a sharp dive in the last year and is at its lowest point since Gallup began polling in 1936.

In response to the question, “Do you approve or disapprove of labor unions?” just 48 percent of respondents said they approve, while 45 percent said they disapprove. That’s a steep fall from August 2008, when the numbers were 59 percent approve, 31 percent disapprove, and it’s the first time approval of unions has ever fallen below 50 percent.

Before this year, American support for unions had remained remarkably stable for nearly four decades. In August 2001, in the first months of George W. Bush’s presidency, Gallup’s results for the same question were 60 percent approve, 32 percent disapprove. In August 1997, in Bill Clinton’s second term, they were 60-31. In 1985, during Ronald Reagan’s presidency, the figures were 58-27. In 1978, during Jimmy Carter’s time in the White House, they were 59-31. And in 1972, during Richard Nixon’s, they were 60-27.

The new poll also shows that many Americans believe the future is bleak for unions. In response to the question, “Thinking about the future, do you think labor unions in this country will become stronger than they are today, the same as today, or weaker than they are today?” 48 percent said unions will become weaker, versus just 24 percent who said unions will become stronger.

And here’s Gallup’s chart:

tvcvpa3inugt-f4thu-qlwSupport’s been remarkably steady since 1937, just two years after the passage of the Wagner Act, but the drop since late 2008 is nothing short of startling. Coincidentally, that was about the time we elected the most beholden-to-Big-Labor administration in recent history, probably since FDR. And what’s happened since last November?

  • The legal rights of bondholders were trampled during the bailouts of GM and Chrysler, largely to benefit UAW pension funds.
  • Representatives of the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) were allowed to sit-in on a meeting between the federal government and California state officials (who were trying to deal with a massive budget crisis) in which the Obama administration threatened to withhold bailout money unless California maintained the wages of SEIU members, regardless of the best interests of the state as a whole.
  • Union thugs affiliated with the SEIU have beaten Americans exercising their constitutional right to free speech to protest ObamaCare at town-hall meetings.
  • The Democrats in Congress and the Obama Administration continue to push for the Orwellian “Employee Free Choice Act,” which would end the secret ballot in union elections and which even George McGovern opposes.
  • The Administration nominated as Labor Secretary Representative Hilda Solis, who flagrantly violated House ethics rules by acting as treasurer for a pro-union organization lobbying Congress on matters she would be voting on.

And that’s just a few.

I’m not against unions per se: in fact, I belong to one. They serve a useful purpose protecting workers from abusive employers, and the right to collective bargaining -if that’s the workers’ free choice- is a good one. But the stories of corruption in union leadership are legendary (Has anyone found Hoffa yet?), and the thuggish, self-serving actions of the UAW and especially the SEIU are reminding people of the threat of unchecked union power.

We shouldn’t be surprised at the precipitous drop in the public’s opinion of unions; the public seems to be realizing that the Big Unions are helping their own people at everyone else’s expense. On this Labor Day union leaders should be anything but relaxed.

LINKSEd Morrissey; Blue Crab Boulevard; Power Line; 247 Things.

UPDATE: Michael Barone has a good analysis of Labor’s drop in popularity. You should read the whole article, but the last paragraph is key:

There’s irony aplenty here. Thanks to the work of Sweeney, Stern and union political organizers, unions entered calendar year 2009 with more political influence than they have had since the 1960s or 1970s. But the way they have deployed that political influence has made the unions more unpopular than they have been in the last 73 years.

Yep.