(Video) Why are there still Palestinian refugees?

May 2, 2016

It’s not because of Israel, one of the most inclusive societies on Earth. Instead, as Dumisani Washington explains in the Prager University video, the Palestinian refugees still exist after three generations because they are politically useful to the Arab states, and the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) needs them to justify their continued existence — and their billion dollar budget. Washington contrasts the Palestinian refugees with the 850,000 Jews expelled by Arab and other Islamic countries in 1948-49, a largely forgotten event, and absorbed by Israel to become productive members of society — with no UN help whatsoever.

Worth watching:

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The State Department’s Refugee Program Shouldn’t be a Terrorist-Funding Welfare Scam

February 26, 2015

“Minnesota, the France of America.” Ouch!

International Liberty

While immigration is a very contentious issue for the politicians in Washington, there’s actually some level of agreement among people in the real world.

Almost everybody agrees that it would be foolish and short-sighted not to allow some immigration, particularly from young, educated people with valuable skills.

Similarly, there is widespread agreement that you can’t have completely open borders, particularly for those who are unlikely to be net contributors to the economy.

So the real debate (and this is where there is a lot of room for disagreement) is who gets to come to America and under what conditions.

I don’t raise this issue because I have any wise words – much less proposed solutions – on the overall issue of immigration.

Instead, let’s look at the profoundly perverse way that the federal government is using the refugee program to expand the problem of dependency.

Here are some excerpts from

View original post 1,064 more words


Residents abandoning Juarez

September 16, 2010

From an article in Borderzine, a student journalism project of the University of Texas at El Paso. The war between the drug cartels has grown so serious that residents are abandoning the city:

According to newspaper records, a historical record was set for monthly and annual homicide totals was in 1995 with 34 victims in the month of August and 294 for the whole year. Fifteen years later, homicide rates have increased nearly ten fold. In 2008, 1,623 murders were recorded, with a much larger number of 2,754 in 2009.

“No longer is the violence in Juarez out of our lives but intricately part of it,” said Diego Acosta, a junior at UTEP.”

“I miss my old life very much, a city one that was once my home. I have built my life here [El Paso], my friends are here, or they come over often, and most importantly I feel safe here; I cannot say the same about Juarez,” lamented Esmeralda Zazueta, a current UTEP sophomore.

Despite the fact she misses Juarez, Zazueta explained that after violent threats to her family, they “panicked, began packing that afternoon, and were living in El Paso within two weeks.”

The violence in Juarez has also affected the housing market. According to Brandi Grissom of The Texas Tribune, Mayor Jose Reyes Ferriz reported an estimate of 20,000 homes have been abandoned since 2008, with the estimates of those who fled, and continue leaving the city, ranging from 100,000 to half a million or 38% of the city’s total population.

“While some have fled north to seek safety and prosperity in America, many more have gone back to their homes in southern Mexico,” Reyes Ferriz said.

According to a survey by the Observatorio de Seguridad y Convivencia Ciudadanas, seven out of ten Juarez citizens reported they have modified their everyday lives and routines due to the intolerable fear. This study showed 63% of the Juarez population perceives the city as dangerous and citizens of the downtown area reported feeling more at risk.

When does “illegal immigration” become a “refugee problem?”

(via Latina Lista)


From illegal aliens to refugees?

April 5, 2010

If this FOX News story represents a trend, the US could soon face a flood of refugees seeking to escape the breakdown of law and order south of the Border:

The spreading violence of the drug wars along the Mexican border may have one unintended consequence. It could upend efforts to curb illegal immigrants by giving Mexican border-crossers a tool they never had before: a valid claim for political asylum.

For decades, immigrants coming from Mexico were denied asylum because Mexico was a stable and relatively peaceful democracy. But that is changing now.

Last week, at least 30 Mexicans from the town of El Porvenir walked to the border crossing post at Fort Hancock, Texas, and asked for political asylum. Ordinarily, their claim would be denied as groundless, and they would be turned back. Instead, they were taken to El Paso, where they expect to have their cases heard.

No one doubts that they have a strong claim. Their town on the Mexican side of the border is under siege by one or more drug cartels battling for control of the key border crossing. According to Mike Doyle, the chief deputy sheriff of Hudspeth County, Texas, one of the cartels has ordered all residents of the town of 10,000 to abandon the city within the next month.

“They came in and put up a sign in the plaza telling everyone to leave or pay with their own blood,” Doyle said. Since then there has been a steady stream of El Porvenir residents seeking safety on the American side of the border, both legally and illegally. Among them are the 30 who are seeking political asylum.

Mexico has had a serious problem with the drug cartels since the mid-80s, and government corruption has only exacerbated it. Now it seems that the writ of the government itself is in danger of collapsing in its northern border area. The federal government has been reluctant to deal firmly with the illegal alien problem for decades, but a refugee crisis and areas controlled by narco-bandits next to our southwestern states may finally force it to face reality: border security is beyond doubt within the duties and powers of the government.

RELATED: Is Mexico on the way to being a failed state?


The euphemism administration

September 28, 2009

So now the detainees at Guantanamo Bay aren’t jihadis, they’re not terrorists, they’re not Islamists … they’re not even “detainees.”

No, they’re refugees. I’m not kidding.

Then again, what else would you expect from an administration that refers to a war as an “overseas contingency operation?”

What’s a good euphemism for “losers?” Loser