UK Special Forces raid Libyan oil site to rescue citizens: no ferry needed

February 27, 2011

Don’t the British realize this is the age of consultations, expressions of concern, and firm public statements? You know, Soft and Smart Power(tm)? Granted, a ferry wouldn’t work in the middle of the desert, but surely Whitehall could have just chartered a few buses instead of sending in the SAS to rescue their own people:

OIL workers stranded in the Libyan desert by the violent chaos engulfing the north African country were evacuated last night in a daring rescue operation by the RAF and British special forces.
Defence Secretary Liam Fox confirmed that two RAF Hercules had airlifted about 150 Britons and other foreign nationals to safety in Malta.

Fears had been growing for British citizens left in remote parts of the country as protests against Colonel Muammar al-Gaddafi’s embattled regime escalated and armed militias supportive of the government opened fire on demonstrators.

Up to 70 military personnel, believed to be SBS and SAS, are understood to have landed in the country yesterday. They split into two groups to travel to camps at Amal, Waha and Nafoora, south of Benghazi. It is understood that the rescuers flew from one camp to another picking up civilian workers.

Want to know something that makes this an extra special treat for us? According to the article, even the French launched a covert operation to get their citizens out. The French.

Meanwhile, the State Department is probably inquiring about caravans with the local camel company.

Okay, sure. Its possible we have something underway that can’t be revealed because the Americans aren’t home safe yet, but, with Captain Obama and the Ferry Crew running the show, I somehow doubt it. Call me crazy.

Remember Sylvester Jr. in the old Warner Brothers cartoons? Whenever his Dad, Sylvester, would do something to embarrass his son, Junior would put a bag over his head and cry “Oh, the shame!”

Right now, I know how he feels.

via Mary in the ST comments

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)