The Struggle Is Real: Federal government studying “cancer inequality”

December 24, 2014

mitchells-first-theorem-of-government

We obviously need government rules regulating the presence of 7-11s near same sex couples, or something:

The federal government is spending over $33,000 to figure out whether same-sex couples live closer to tobacco retailers, theoretically making them more likely to smoke.

A National Institutes of Health (NIH) project, entitled, “Relationship Between Tobacco Retailer Density and Sexual Minority Couples,” reasons that since many gay and lesbian couples live in cities, they may be close to stores that sell cigarettes, such as 7 Elevens.

“Tobacco use is substantially higher among sexual minorities than among heterosexuals,” the grant states. “The reasons for this persistent disparity remain unclear, but the high toll of death and disability from tobacco use creates substantial health inequalities in cancer.”

In other words, because same-sex couples tend to congregate in urban areas, and because urban areas have higher concentrations of shops that sell cigarettes, and because homosexuals apparently smoke more than heterosexuals, there may be a relationship to higher rates of cancer among gays and lesbians.

Let me save the government thirty-three thousand taxpayer dollars: it’s called “temptation.” The density of tobacco vendors in an urban environment is the same for everyone dwelling in it; if gays and lesbians are suffering higher rates of cancer, it’s because they’re giving in to it and haven’t quit smoking at the same rate as straights. Hence the higher rates of cancer. Solution: stop smoking. Like any addiction, it’s tough, but it can be done.

But that requires individual initiative, personal responsibility, and doesn’t require government.

Can’t have that.

Instead we needed a government study into the dilemma of “cancer inequality.” Next should come the declaration of a victim group whose rights are being violated, followed by new FDA regulations.

And more taxpayer-funded welfare for researchers and bureaucrats.

(Graphic courtesy of Dan Mitchell)


California school district buys $14,000 espresso maker to save jobs. Or something.

September 15, 2014
"For the children?"

“For the children?”

No, really.

The break room coffee machine is a staple of many a workplace. Usually though, it tends to fall on the “economical” or “value” side of the java spectrum.

But not in Castro Valley, California, where officials with the Castro Valley Unified School District are taking fire for the purchase of a $14,000 espresso maker.

The outrage was immediate. According to KPIX News in San Francisco, the school board’s facebook page was flooded with angry comments when word of the pricey espresso maker – paid for with taxpayer money – got out.

According to a school board official, buying the espresso machine was “an opportunity” to keep a part-time child nutritionist on staff. If you can’t see that, you must hate the children.

Though how a $14,000 espresso maker for the staff and child nutrition go together is a bit baffling. When I was in fourth grade, we were served chocolate milk, not a double shot.

And for an additional fourteen grand per year, maybe they could have made that nutritionist full-time? Or used it to… Oh, I don’t know. Buy new textbooks and school supplies for the kids?

Silly me. I guess a Mr. Coffee is just too déclassé for the Castro Valley school board.

Can’t wait to see the board members justify this to the voters.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Rewarding failure: GSA awards big contract to designer of #Obamacare web site

July 8, 2014
Obama foreign policy advisers

GSA contracts oversight team

Because they did such a great job with the federal Obamacare web site, why shouldn’t they be given the chance to compete for billions more of our tax dollars?

FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA, Jul 08, 2014 (Marketwired via COMTEX) — CGI Federal Inc. (CGI) GIB -1.59% CA:GIB.A -1.49% announced today that the General Services Administration (GSA) has chosen the company as a prime contractor under a new contract vehicle known as One Acquisition Solution for Integrated Services (OASIS). The multi-award contract has an unlimited ceiling, allowing CGI to compete for billions of dollars in complex professional services task orders across all agencies in the U.S. federal government.

GSA oversees the business of the federal government, among other things supplying federal purchasers with cost-effective, high-quality products and services from commercial vendors. CGI is one of 74 awardees under OASIS, an “indefinite delivery indefinite quantity” (IDIQ) contract that will allow awardees to compete on a range of program management, management consulting, logistics, engineering, scientific and financial management services. Awardees will also be able to offer technology solutions as an ancillary service. For the first time, agencies will be able to purchase high-value professional services along with supporting IT solutions through a single contract, saving customers time and money.

The Obamacare site rollout was such a fiasco that the Federal government refused to renew its contract with CGI when it expired last February. And this isn’t the only time they’ve been told to go away: the government of the Canadian province of Ontario fired CGI for missed deadlines and a failure to deliver a functional product, an online medical registry.

So, naturally the GSA decides that CGI warrants even more chances to deliver “quality IT solutions.” This being the same GSA that’s managed our dollars so well in the past.

What could go wrong?

via Iowahawk

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


EPA to blow $1.6 million on fancy hotel for “environmental justice” conference?

June 28, 2014
x

EPA conference planner

Well, if you’re going to host a conference for nearly a month, you can’t expect people to stay at a Super 8. That would be cruel. A Holiday Inn? No, one can only eat so many free continental breakfasts. Nope, the only thing that will do for people fighting for “environmental justice” (and getting a taxpayer funded month-long vacation) is one of the best hotels in D.C.:

The agency posted its intention to contract with the Renaissance Arlington Local Capital View Hotel for its upcoming public meeting, for which it will need to book 195 rooms for 24 days.

“The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), Office of Enforcement and Compliance, Office of Environmental Justice (OEJ) intends to award a fixed-price Purchase Order … to the Renaissance Arlington Local Capital View Hotel,” the solicitation said. “The purpose of this acquisition is to cover the cost of 195 sleeping room nights from Sept. 9 [to] Oct 2, 2014, at government rate for the 50th public meeting of the National Environmental Justice Advisory Council (NEJAC), a federal advisory committee of the EPA.”

Rooms at the Renaissance Arlington run for roughly $349 a night. At 24 nights, the cost of 195 rooms will reach $1,633,320, or $8,376 per room.

The government per diem rate for lodging is $219 for September. If the EPA receives the per diem rate, the cost will come to $1,024,920 for the duration of their stay.

What’s a million-and-a-half among friends, eh? Maybe they’ll make Star Trek videos, too!

PS: As one wit on Twitter said, referring back to this story:

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Happy birthday, Stimulus!

February 17, 2012

Today is the third anniversary of the passage of President Obama’s Stimulus Pokulus bill, which was supposed to have us at below 6% unemployment by now. How’s that working out?

Whatever. Let’s not quibble over small details, such as being utterly, humiliatingly wrong. Instead, this is a time to celebrate Porkulus’ many accomplishments — the jobs and wealth created. How our (borrowed from China) money was wisely spent. Stories such as this one:

In an effort to stabilize the city’s real estate market, a federal stimulus program has spent nearly $1.5 million on eight Modesto homes that ended up being worth less than $1 million.

Example: Taxpayers paid $223,641 to buy and fix up a foreclosed south Modesto house that was built in 1992. But when the city’s 16-month renovation project was done, the home appraised and sold for only $114,000.

The government lost $109,641 on that just completed deal.

Taxpayers also have spent $109,494 to buy and renovate a 1948-vintage two-bedroom home in Modesto’s airport neighborhood. That house has appraised for only $55,000, and a buyer has yet to be found.

The federally funded Neighborhood Stabilization Program is being managed by the city of Modesto, which plans to resell an additional 18 or more rehabilitated homes this year.

The eight refurbished Modesto homes have cost taxpayers, on average, 34 percent more than appraisers determined they were worth after repairs were complete. That’s an average of $61,487 each.

In investing, that’s called “value destroyed.” And, as of the article’s writing, they weren’t finished!

Happy birthday, Porkulus! Just think of what President Obama can do with four more years!

via Elizabeth Emken for Senate

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Want to make a lot of money? Get a job in D.C.!

October 19, 2011

It’s the top-income city in the nation!

Federal employees whose compensation averages more than $126,000 and the nation’s greatest concentration of lawyers helped Washington edge out San Jose as the wealthiest U.S. metropolitan area, government data show.

The U.S. capital has swapped top spots with Silicon Valley, according to recent Census Bureau figures, with the typical household in the Washington metro area earning $84,523 last year. The national median income for 2010 was $50,046.

The figures demonstrate how the nation’s political and financial classes are prospering as the economy struggles with unemployment above 9 percent and thousands of Americans protest in the streets against income disparity, said Kevin Zeese, director of Prosperity Agenda, a Baltimore-based advocacy group trying to narrow the divide between rich and poor.

There’s a gap that’s isolating Washington from the reality of the rest of the country,” Zeese said. “They just get more and more out of touch.”

But, according to Harry Reid’s version reality, it’s the public sector that’s suffering the most in this lousy economy.

Silicon Valley at least makes valuable things to justify those high salaries. DC creates $787 billion failed “stimulus” packages, bloated payrolls, and regulations that make it harder for the private sector to hire anyone.

What’s wrong with this picture?

via Iowahawk


Wisconsin recalls: that was money well-spent

August 10, 2011

That is, it’s good news that union bosses, progressives,  and Democratic Party honchos (splitting hairs, I know) sank about $30,000,000 into a losing effort in last night’s state senate recall elections, money that they will desperately need elsewhere in 2012. It’s not so good if you’re a Labor boss, progressive, or Democrat (but I repeat myself) and have just seen that the old cheap tricks aren’t working like they used to. And it really stinks if you’re a union member who saw part of his or her mandatory, no-choice-in-the-matter dues flushed down a toilet.

Let’s recap:

In 2010, the people of Wisconsin elected a Republican legislature and a Republican governor who all campaign openly on the need for fiscal reform in the state, including the reform of public sector labor unions. They made no secret of this, and the people chose them. Then, in 2011, the duly-elected and democratically elected legislature and governor shocked everyone (who wasn’t paying attention) by actually trying to carry out their promises by introducing the necessary legislation.

The Left (let’s just use the collective term, for brevity’s sake) then did what any adult, mature, responsible faction that had lost a fair election would do: they threw a tantrum.

Eight Fourteen Democratic state senators tried to throw a monkey wrench into democracy by fleeing the state for Illinois (1), denying the senate a quorum and in clear dereliction of their duty. Meanwhile, their progressive allies unleashed their arsenal of reasoned discourse: they occupied the legislature (trashing it and the grounds), they held drum circles, they called their democratically-elected opponents Nazis, and they physically threatened Republican legislators, the governor, and their supporters.

And yet still those nasty Republicans wouldn’t listen to sweet reason; they passed the bill, anyway.

So the Left, being good democrats and respectful of the will of the People, did the next logical thing: they tried to overturn the results of the recent election by forcing recall elections for six Republican state senators. (Republicans retaliated by forcing recall elections for two Democrats next week.) They needed to win three to take control of the State Senate and hamstring Governor Walker’s agenda for at least the next several months.

And they lost:

Democrats won two state Senate seats in Tuesday’s historic recall elections, but failed to capture a third seat that would have given them control of the chamber.

By keeping a majority in the Senate, Republicans retained their monopoly on state government because they also hold the Assembly and governor’s office. Tuesday’s elections narrowed their majority – at least for now – from 19-14 to a razor-thin 17-16.

Republicans may be able to gain back some of the losses next week, when two Democrats face recall elections.

Democrats had hoped to block the Republican agenda by taking control of the Senate in the recall elections, but the GOP should be able to continue to advance its agenda.

“I think it’s a huge victory for us,” said John Hogan, director of the Committee to Elect a Republican Senate. “Voters gave us a mandate last fall. . . . They backed us up again (Tuesday). Voters told us loud and clear, ‘Stay the course. Things are working.'”

But Democrats claimed victory for the two seats they captured from Republicans.

“We went on their turf and we won on Republican turf,” said Mike Tate, chairman of the state Democratic Party. “We will not stop, we will not rest . . . until we recall (Gov.) Scott Walker.”

Yeah, good luck with that, Mike. Of the two seats you won, one is a heavily Democratic district and, in the other, the Republican was tainted by scandal. In the others you were beaten handily, even in one that was expected to be close.  Your plot to seize control of the state senate is dead, and there’s a reasonable chance you could lose next week the two seats you gained this week.

In other words, Democrats, union bosses, and progressives, for your $30,000,000 and all your bussed in, slogan-chanting help, and even if you save those two seats next week, you’ll have won nothing. Zip. Zero. Nada. Bupkis.

So go ahead, try to recall Walker next year. Take your campaign to save your corrupt, self-serving arrangements to other states. Spend all the money you can. It looks like a great idea.

To conservatives.

via Memeorandum

EDIT: There were 14 state senators who went over the wire, not eight. Thanks to Steve in the ST comments.

LINKS: More at Hot Air. David Freddoso: “Unions lose big.”

Footnotes:
(1) The Best Western in Rockford, to be exact, where they continued to collect their salaries and life was a hardship.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Friends and allies: most major terror plots originate in Pakistan — Updated

July 7, 2011

Don’t forget, we’ve given Pakistan more than $18 billion in aid since September 11th, 2001. Gee, thanks for having our backs, guys:

Most of the major terrorist plots against the West since 2004 had links to Pakistan, including two that targeted Canada, says a study to be released today by a U.S. think tank.

In just over half of the 32 “serious” plots identified in the New America Foundation study, the participants had received either training or direction from jihadists in Pakistan.

The findings underscore Pakistan’s role as al-Qaeda’s primary safe haven, despite recent concerns about countries like Yemen, writes investigative journalist Paul Cruickshank, the study’s author.

“This paper has shown that by some measures al-Qaeda’s safe haven in Pakistan has actually become more dangerous in recent years. More serious plots emerged in the West in 2010 linked to established jihadist groups in Pakistan than in any year since al-Qaeda built up its operations in FATA in the early 2000s.”

FATA is the acronym for the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, the rugged frontier region of Pakistan, where al-Qaeda and its affiliates have set up since the fall of the Taliban in Afghanistan.

In 53% of terror plots, members of the groups involved had trained in Pakistan, compared with 6% in Yemen, 3% in Iraq and 38% where no overseas training occurred, the study says.

Forty-four percent of the plots were directed by jihadist groups in Pakistan, while 6% were directed from Yemen, 3% from Iraq and 47% had no clear overseas direction.

Most of the Western recruits who went to Pakistan had initially wanted to fight NATO forces in Afghanistan but were instead persuaded to return to their home countries to conduct terrorist attacks, it says.

This isn’t to say the Pak government directed these attacks (though in some cases they have), but the central government is chronically weak, and large factions are very sympathetic to al Qaeda, the Taliban, and the jihadist cause overall. They’ve been at best a part-time ally, sometimes giving us important cooperation, sometimes working against us — often at the same time. We’ve tolerated it because we not only need the cooperation we do get (Several al Qaeda bigwigs were nabbed with Pakistani help.), but because our position in Afghanistan has required putting up with a lot to keep supply routes open through the Khyber pass.

But that situation is changing with Obama’s decision to run away withdraw from Afghanistan; we just won’t need that supply route nearly as much.

And if that’s the case, and if so much terrorism originates in Pakistan and the government is unable or unwilling to stop it, why should we keep giving them so much money? Or do we keep paying tribute for fear Pakistani nukes would otherwise wind up in the wrong hands?

My own feelings mirror those of Victor Davis Hanson: time to say “Adios, Pakistan!”

via Undhimmi

UPDATE: And just to add a bit of fuel to the fire, our “allies” were selling nuke secrets to the North Koreans:

The founder of Pakistan’s nuclear bomb program asserts that the government of North Korea bribed top military officials in Islamabad to obtain access to sensitive nuclear technology in the late 1990s.

Abdul Qadeer Khan has made available documents that he says support his claim that he personally transferred more than $3 million in payments by North Korea to senior officers in the Pakistani military, which he says subsequently approved his sharing of technical know-how and equipment with North Korean scientists.

Admittedly, this was in the 1990s, but still, not something you want to see in a responsible friend and partner.

To say the least. (via The Jawas)

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


The wind-power farce

July 3, 2011

Maybe “scam” would be a better word for something that is pushed as a “green solution” to anthropogenic global warming (1) , yet doesn’t do what it promises to do, but what it does do is done at tremendous public cost, all while making the alleged problem worse. In the UK, wind farms have become the government’s centerpiece for fighting climate change (2). Christopher Booker, writing about this policy in the Telegraph, explains why wind power is a chimera worthy of Don Quixote tilting at windmills:

Centrica and other energy companies last week told [the Department of Energy and Climate Change] that, if Britain is to spend £100 billion on building thousands of wind turbines, it will require the building of 17 new gas-fired power stations simply to provide back-up for all those times when the wind drops and the windmills produce even less power than usual.

We will thus be landed in the ludicrous position of having to spend an additional £10 billion on those 17 dedicated power stations, which will be kept running on “spinning reserve”, 24 hours a day, just to make up for the fundamental problem of wind turbines. This is that their power continually fluctuates anywhere between full capacity to zero (where it often stood last winter, when national electricity demand was at a peak). So unless back-up power is instantly available to match any shortfall, the lights will go out.

Two things make this even more absurd. One, as the energy companies pointed out to DECC, is that it will be amazingly costly and wildly uneconomical, since the dedicated power plants will often have to run at a low rate of efficiency, burning gas but not producing electricity. This will add billions more to our fuel bills for no practical purpose. The other absurdity, as recent detailed studies have confirmed, is that gas-fired power stations running on “spinning reserve” chuck out much more CO2 than when they are running at full efficiency – thus negating any savings in CO2 emissions supposedly achieved by the windmills themselves.

And before we laugh and point at the Brits for their folly, keep in mind that these are the very same “solutions” that the Obama administration, its eco-statist allies, and the corporations that would benefit from the required government subsidies all want to impose on us. We even have a whole government agency devoted to pimping wind power, while the administration has shown repeatedly its hostility toward developing our vast coal and oil supplies.

Rather than laugh, we should look to Britain for a warning.

Footnotes:

(1) A problem, remember, that does not exist.

(2) Attempting to control the world’s thermostat. Someone should introduce these idiots to King Canute.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Giving public employees raises disguised as bonuses

June 24, 2011

Here’s an interesting (and maddening) video from the California branch of Americans for Prosperity that shows how city governments disguise raises for public employees as “incentive bonuses,” often given for meeting the basic requirements of their job. For example, a licensed veterinary technician can get a $3,132 bonus for… being a licensed veterinary technician, which is prerequisite to even getting the job.

Oh, and it gets better than that:

Now, I usually have nothing against public employees (1), except when they try to treat the public treasury as a piggy bank. However, I reserve the bulk of my ire for public officials who are supposed to be responsible stewards of the public’s money (2) and instead use that money to buy votes, favors, and election help. And I have no respect for the dishonesty required to disguise a pay raise as a bonus because the elected official is too scared to honestly ask his bosses, the voters.

While this video is local to Los Angeles, we can be sure this dishonest graft-by-another-name goes on in other cities. It’s wrong at any time, but it is especially galling in an age when many municipalities are facing bankruptcy. And who would be surprised to find similar shenanigans at the state level?

The age of pigs-at-the-trough is coming to an end, and it’s past time to treat a public trust –the power to spend the people’s money– as a trust. Los Angeles can start by putting a stop to its ridiculous bonus system.

Footnotes:

(1) Being one myself, that is. But I do have to wonder how I missed out on the gravy train. Must’ve picked the wrong agency to work for. Danggit.

(2) Yeah, I rolled my eyes at that one, too.

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Presented in Evidence of our Eventual Doom: $600 grand for a gurgling toad

April 5, 2011

I’m all for odd and amusing public art, but not for $600,000 of federal taxpayer money:

Decried as wasteful spending that will be seen by just a couple thousand of daily workers who arrive on bus shuttles, foes have tried to delay the decision, expected tomorrow, April 1. But in an E-mail, an Army Corps of Engineers official said that the decision can’t be held up because it would impact completion of the huge project.

The City of Alexandria just announced that there are four works of art being considered and that a final decision needs to be made fast. The artwork was put on display for public comment from March 24 to today. The Alexandria News first reported the hasty announcement to decide a winner.

The schedule surprised some who thought that the costly artwork project was on the “back burner,” according to critic Donald Buch, a member of the mayor’s advisory committee overseeing the Mark Center project. “What’s the rush?” he asked.

What’s the rush?? Well, I tell you, mister: What red-blooded federal worker wouldn’t want to see a giant statue of a fairy riding a toad on their morning commute — with sound effects!

Your tax dollars at work:

via The Jawa Report

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


Stimulating Los Angeles: Porkulus’ cost per job

September 18, 2010

It’s already an old story with the 2009 “stimulus package,” but this report on the number of jobs created here in Los Angeles by Porkulus and what they each cost is just appalling:

More than a year after Congress approved $800 billion in stimulus funds, the Los Angeles city controller has released a 40-page report on how the city spent its share, and the results are not living up to expectations.

“I’m disappointed that we’ve only created or retained 55 jobs after receiving $111 million,” said Wendy Greuel, the city’s controller. “With our local unemployment rate over 12 percent we need to do a better job cutting red tape and putting Angelenos back to work.”

According to the audit, the Los Angeles Department of Public Works spent $70 million in stimulus funds — in return, it created seven private sector jobs and saved seven workers from layoffs. Taxpayer cost per job: $1.5 million.

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation created even fewer jobs per dollar, spending $40 million but netting just nine jobs. Taxpayer cost per job: $4.4 million.

They’d have earned a better return on their investment (with our money) by going to Vegas and betting it all at the roulette wheel.

Heckuva job, Mr. President.

(And, hey, wasn’t Sheriff Joe supposed to keep watch to make sure the money wasn’t wasted? I’d swear I remember something about that… )

via The Flash Report


Adventures in government incompetence, L.A. County edition

August 24, 2010

It takes a special kind of genius to burn $50,000,000 in a failed effort to save $13,000,000:

After spending more than $154 million for a system of locking turnstiles and electronic payment cards for the county transit system, officials are discovering that at least a third of the money may have been wasted because they can’t use the new devices as planned.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority placed the locking turnstiles at subway and light-rail stations to stop fare scofflaws and end what had previously been an honor-based system.

Installed under a $46 million contract, the turnstiles were predicted to save $13 a million a year in lost revenue and reduced fare inspector costs.

But the turnstiles can’t be configured to lock until Metro fully converts to a new electronic Transit Access Pass system – and that is proving nearly impossible.

The stalled effort has raised questions from critics about whether the turnstile contract has turned into a costly boondoggle.

“Raised questions?” I should think pitchforks and torches are in order. The subway itself was a grandiose and monstrous waste of money, do we have to keep throwing ever more into its tunnels?

(via Mayor Sam’s Sister City)


Real or fake? Spot the stimulus project!

August 14, 2010

The Rebel Economist returns to YouTube with a video in which she asks passersby if the projects she describes really received taxpayer money under the Stimulus bill:

Aren’t you glad we borrowed $787 billion for these?  Doh


Your stimulus dollars at work

August 10, 2010

Sean Mahoney is running for Congress from New Hampshire’s 1st district and has a question for incumbent Carole Shea Porter (D-Gimme Your Money): Just what did we get for all the debt incurred with the $787 billion stimulus package your party passed? To provide an example from their own district, Mahoney tells the tale of New Hampshire’s own bridge to nowhere:

Let’s emphasize a couple of points (just in case YouTube is having troubles, again): the bridge is not a bridge – it’s more of a pier, stopping in the middle of the river. $150,000 of our tax dollars were paid to resurface a “bridge” no one uses; the real bridge is 100′ further down the river. (Visit Big Government for photos.) Meanwhile, about a third of New Hampshire’s real bridges are in need of real repair.

Now, aren’t you happy we borrowed all that money from China so that Carole Shea Porter could get New Hampshire its own bridge to nowhere?

If you are, how about making a donation – to Sean Mahoney?

(Crossposted at Sister Toldjah)


FAA spends five million on hookers and booze

December 23, 2009

But, don’t worry. It was all part of their training, to make sure they were on the same page. Or something:

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) spent five million dollars this month to bring 3, 600 managers to a conference in Atlanta that FAA whistleblowers and critics say was little more than an excuse to throw a three-week-long Christmas party.

“It’s the wrong time to spend five million dollars on a Christmas party for anybody’s employees, especially in the government,” said Tom Schatz, the president of Citizens Against Government Waste, a non-profit watchdog group.

Undercover video to be broadcast tonight on ABC World News with Diane Sawyer shows FAA managers drinking heavily and making the rounds of Atlanta bars after a day of meetings.

One FAA manager told an ABC News undercover reporter, “Anytime you get a bunch of FAA guys together, it is nothing but a party.” Another said, “It beats being at work.”

The FAA says the purpose of the December meetings was to train managers on the new contract for air traffic controllers that went into effect on Oct. 1.

“This is worth it because we have to get the frontline managers on-board with what we’re trying to do,” said Hank Krakowski, the chief operating officer of the FAA’s Air Traffic Operations.

The FAA managers received $81 per day to spend on meals and personal expenses. The hotel room cost was $140 per night.

At the end of one day of meetings, an FAA manager said he and others were about to head out “to dance on tables shortly.” He boasted he was “almost arrested” for being drunk and “dancing on the tables” at the last such FAA managers gathering in St. Louis in 2006.

Another conference attendee asked a female ABC News undercover reporter if she was a “hooker” because “I was ready to reach for my wallet.”

Obviously, I went to work for the wrong employer. The best we get is a plate of cookies; the FAA gets a “spread the wealth” program for call-girls.

And, gee, do you think this will play well with a public already angry at a vastly expanding and expensive federal bureaucracy, in which jobs and salaries are skyrocketing during a severe recession?

Yeah. Me, too.  I dont know


Such a bargain…

October 30, 2009

The Obama Administration told us we had to pass the $787-billion dollar Stimulus bill NOW!! in order to save and create jobs to blunt the worst recession in decades. Well the numbers are in:

  • Money spent so far: $150,000,000,000
  • Number of jobs created or saved: 650,000
  • Price per job: $230,769.23

Only in a Washington controlled by statists who’ve never had to deal with economic reality in their lives could this be considered a worthwhile use of public money.

Can I have one?  Money Eyes


How is that stimulus working for you, Barry?

October 22, 2009

Team Obama told us the $787,000,000,000 stimulus package had to be passed NOW!! to save and/or create jobs. And it did: 1800 in North Dakota, alone. And I do mean “alone.”

Go here to see what happened in the other 49 states and DC.

Hope! Change! That’s the way to spread happiness! Sing it, kids!

(hat tip: Allahpundit)